Thirty-three Percent of Your Leaders are Looking for Other Work!


Signing Contract

Recently Modern Survey posted a blog titled American’s Leadership Exodus talking about 33% of leaders at organizations with 100+ employees are currently look for a new job. While this is shocking, it’s not surprising. Evaluating what has occurred in industry since early 2000, much has changed. In the early 2000’s there was a “war on talent” where the job openings out numbered quality candidates. More people were employed than there were jobs available. Then in the mid-2000’s the economy shifted and we experienced our great recession - where there was more talent available than jobs. However, during this time social media exploded. LinkedIn was founded in 2003, Facebook in 2004, Twitter in 2006 and Glassdoor in 2007. Now the passive candidate is informed almost daily of jobs they may be interested in via LinkedIn. Candidates can comment on their current/past employers on Glassdoor. Anyone can tell all their friends/followers about their work on Facebook and Twitter. Using technology, it’s very easy for someone who is actively employed and performing to multitask and also look for a new opportunity. Additionally, while unemployment is down to 5.7% (January, 2015), the way companies find their new recruits has changed. Recruiters are looking for the passive candidate via social networking tools such as LinkedIn to find their new recruits. Now, more than ever, it’s imperative that organizations evaluate what they are doing for continuous development and providing meaningful work for their current and future leaders. At Avail, we define Career Coaching as Coaching individuals who are or desire to advance in their career, or further develop their leadership skills. Additionally, we deliver programs to help identify and grow your current and future leaders to be Successors or General Managers as your business grows and/or changes. Please read more about how we can help your business here.

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